BNRN, MN(c)

Instructor

Qey (Hello), my name is Jasmine Murchison-Perley. I am a two-spirit, Wolastoqey woman from Neqotkuk at Tobique First Nation in Wapohnahki Territory. I am a first-generation academic, receiving my Bachelor of Nursing from the University of New Brunswick (UNB) in 2018. 

I am a Registered Nurse (RN) and a current Master of Nursing student with an interest in the Indigenous new graduate nurse experience in transition to practice, as a recruitment and retention strategy in Atlantic Canada.

My background and passion lie in the areas of Indigenous health and wellness, Indigenous methodologies, decolonizing health policy, and systemic racism.

I look forward to having the opportunity to meet, learn from, and support you as we embark on this new journey!

Books recommended by Jasmine

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.

Indigenous Methodologies: Characteristics, Conversations, and Contexts, Second Edition

Indigenous Methodologies is a groundbreaking text. Since its original publication in 2009, it has become the most trusted guide used in the study of Indigenous methodologies and has been adopted in university courses around the world. It provides a conceptual framework for implementing Indigenous methodologies and serves as a useful entry point for those wishing to learn more broadly about Indigenous research.

Share This